Tsibele ("tsih-bu-leh") is a new-traditional klezmer band based in Brooklyn, New York. Their repertoire comes from Moldovan/Bessarabian music and the music of Jewish migrants from Europe to America, including the music of the Belf era. Tsibele's music explores the limits of the klezmer idiom through improvisation and songs from the edges of klezmer. Tsibele means onion in Yiddish.  Tsibele is available to be a part of the celebration at all of your life events: weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs, and other simchas. While rooted in the traditional klezmer idiom, we are also interested in experimenting with newer sounds: from effects pedals to rock-oriented versions of Yiddish songs. We happily vacillate between the traditional and the experimental, equally comfortable playing an acoustic dance set at a wedding and an electronic house concert, and everything in between.  Each band member brings their own unique take on klezmer music. Accordionist Hannah Temple combines a commitment to activism with a love for languages. Flutist/ vocalist Eleonore Weill brings the earthy sounds of the village in southern France, where she grew up playing hurdy-gurdy in the fields. Violinist Zoë Aqua has a passion for pedagogy and for transcribing hundred-year-old klezmer violin recordings. The warm, fuzzy feeling you get from that sweet sweet trumpet sound comes from Eva Boodman, who has years of experience playing in Balkan brass bands. Together they present a unique voice in the klezmer scene. 

Tsibele ("tsih-bu-leh") is a new-traditional klezmer band based in Brooklyn, New York. Their repertoire comes from Moldovan/Bessarabian music and the music of Jewish migrants from Europe to America, including the music of the Belf era. Tsibele's music explores the limits of the klezmer idiom through improvisation and songs from the edges of klezmer. Tsibele means onion in Yiddish. 

Tsibele is available to be a part of the celebration at all of your life events: weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs, and other simchas. While rooted in the traditional klezmer idiom, we are also interested in experimenting with newer sounds: from effects pedals to rock-oriented versions of Yiddish songs. We happily vacillate between the traditional and the experimental, equally comfortable playing an acoustic dance set at a wedding and an electronic house concert, and everything in between. 

Each band member brings their own unique take on klezmer music. Accordionist Hannah Temple combines a commitment to activism with a love for languages. Flutist/ vocalist Eleonore Weill brings the earthy sounds of the village in southern France, where she grew up playing hurdy-gurdy in the fields. Violinist Zoë Aqua has a passion for pedagogy and for transcribing hundred-year-old klezmer violin recordings. The warm, fuzzy feeling you get from that sweet sweet trumpet sound comes from Eva Boodman, who has years of experience playing in Balkan brass bands. Together they present a unique voice in the klezmer scene. 

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